Hummingbird Hawk Moth Macroglossum stellatarum

This migrant daytime flying moth arrives in Britain from southern Europe and northern Africa from April onwards. It can be seen hovering in front of flowers from which it feeds with its long proboscis. Eggs are laid on Ladies Bedstraw, Madder and Hedge Bedstraw and caterpillars may be found between June and October. Mick Farmer did well to capture this photograph of the moth feeding.

Hummingbird Hawk-moth, Bewdley, 2 June 2017 ©Mick Farmer

 

 

Cardinal Beetle Pyrochroa coccinea

This colourful cardinal beetle has emerged in Wyre and can be found on ground vegetation in May and June. There is another closely related species with a red head, although this black-headed species seems to be the more commoner of the two in the Wyre Forest. Their larvae live under the bark of dead trees.

Cardinal beetle Pyrochroa coccinea, Wyre Forest, May 2017 ©Mick Farmer

Painted Lady butterfly

Mick Farmer spotted this Painted Lady in his garden in Bewdley recently, one of the first to be seen locally. It has flown north from its emergence site, probably in North Africa. This cosmopolitan migrant can arrive any time in spring or summer prior to breeding here later in the summer. Eggs are generally laid on thistles and the adults that result in this country show some southerly migration in the autumn.

Painted Lady, Bewdley, May 2017 ©Mick Farmer

Pearl-bordered Fritillary – Boloria euphrosyne

On sunny days in May Pearl-bordered Fritillaries may be seen flying in Wyre. They are often difficult to track as they fly so quickly like golden jewels above the ground vegetation, but Roger Plant was able to get this beautiful photo of a female when the sun went in and it had stopped for a rest.

Female Pearl-bordered Fritillary, Longdon, 13 May 2017 ©Roger Plant

Wood Ants up in the air!

In New Parks there is an 8 foot high wooden post in a sunny glade. Wood Ants (Formica rufa) were observed climbing up carrying nest material, so Roger Plant devised a cunning technique to successfully obtain a photograph of the top of the post. We know that these ants often centre their nest on a dead log – but this pole is a bit ambitious! We shall have to see how the nest develops.

Wood Ants taking nesting material up the pole, 3 May 2017 ©Graham Hill

Roger Plant photographing Wood Ants on the post, 3 May 2017

Wood Ants on top of the pole with nesting material ©Roger Plant

 

Frizzled Pincushion, Ulota phyllantha

Ann Hill pointed out this small delicate moss on the trunk of an oak tree. A brown nerve protrudes from the tip of each leaf and these are often surrounded by clusters of brown gamma. The leaves curl up when dry. This is not common in Wyre, so it was good to record it this week. It has increased in Britain in recent years.

Frizzled Pincushion Ulota phyllantha, New Parks, 3 May 2017 ©Rosemary Winnall

Bullhead with eggs

This Bullhead (also known as Miller’s Thumb) was found underneath a stone in Park Brook. Closer inspection revealed its eggs attached to the stone. Apparently, in the spring the male makes a shallow hollow in the stream bed in which several females lay eggs. Then he guards the eggs until they hatch after about a month. He was certainly very amenable to having his photograph to be taken under water before we gently replaced his stone.

Male Bullhead protecting eggs, Park Brook, 3 May 2017 ©Rosemary Winnall

Bullhead eggs, Park Brook, 3 May 2017 ©Rosemary Winnall