Snowflakes

A late night walk in the snowy garden with a magnifying glass enabled me to see some detail in the snow flakes – what lovely patterns there are!

Snowflakes, 18 March 2018 © Rosemary Winnall

Snowflakes, 18 March 2018 © Rosemary Winnall

Snowflakes, 18 March 2018 ©Rosemary Winnall

 

Elfcup (Sarcoscypha sp.)

Elfcups are spring cup fungi that brighten our late winter woodland floor with their attractive fruiting bodies. They grow, often in troops, on rotten fallen twigs of broad-leaved trees. Previously thought to be one species, it has recently been discovered that there are two, only separated by details of the spores. Scarlet Elfcup (Sarcoscypha austriaca) appears to be commoner than Ruby Elfcup (Sarcoscypha coccinea).

An elfcup (Sarcoscypha sp.) in the snow, New Parks, 17 March 2018

Birds in the snow

In cold weather food is short for many birds, and they can become easier to watch and photograph when they come down to food we provide. Apples and seed put out on the ground in the garden during the recent cold spell, attracted many Blackbirds, Fieldfares, Redwings, Starlings and even several Song Thrushes all feeding together. But with the return of the mild weather they soon dispersed.

Redwing in the snow, Bliss Gate, 2 March 2018 ©Rosemary Winnall

Fieldfare in the snow, Bliss Gate, 2 March 2018 ©Rosemary Winnall

Starling in the snow, Bliss Gate, 2 March 2018 ©Rosemary Winnall